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List from Northwest U.S. Entertainment publication

The List (Top 200 albums of the last 40 years)

http://www.kitsapsun.com/bsun/entertainment/article/0,2403,BSUN_19066_4171165,00.html


1. "The Beatles" – The Beatles (1968)

Better known as the White Album, the simply-titled "The Beatles"
implies a sense of unity and belies the true nature of the recording
sessions that created it. The band was coming apart, and it's reflected
in the music. More independent than ever, John, Paul, George and Ringo
wrote some of the best songs of their careers, enough to fill two whole
albums. Harrison's sad "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" could well be the
best of the bunch.

2. "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" – The Beatles (1967)

This is the one that broke all the rules about what could be done in
the studio. In a frenzy of creativity, the Beatles took on the
identities of the band in the title and let go of their inhibitions.
Wildly imaginative, "Sgt. Pepper's" may not be the best Beatles' album
song for song, but as a concept and cohesive whole it's unmatched.

3. "Nevermind" – Nirvana (1991)

Erupting like Mount St. Helens, that sound you heard coming from the
Northwest was a major shift in popular music. For good or bad, Nirvana
slammed alternative into the mainstream and spawned countless sound
alike bands. Twelve angst-ridden punk anthems infused with a healthy
dose of pop melody, including the epochal "Smells Like Teen Spirit."

4. "Dark Side of the Moon" – Pink Floyd (1973)

Confining their sonic explorations into the constricts of actual songs,
Pink Floyd hit their artistic and commercial peak. If anyone could make
music on the dark side of the moon, this might well be what it would
sound like. Rather than restricting themselves, they opened up a whole
new aural world, exemplified by the hit song "Money."

5. "Are You Experienced?" – The Jimi Hendrix Experience (1967)

If electric guitar wasn't the signature instrument of rock 'n' roll
before Jimi Hendrix came along, it sure as hell was afterward. The best
debut album of all time, the track listing reads like a greatest hits
package. "Purple Haze," "The Wind Cries Mary," "Fire" and "Foxey Lady"
are just a sampling of the well known songs bursting forth from this
explosive record.

6. "Highway 61 Revisited" – Bob Dylan (1965)

Completing Dylan's electric transformation, "Highway 61Revisited" leads
off with "Like a Rolling Stone," one of the greatest rock songs ever
written, and culminates in the epic, 11-minute "Desolation Row."
Musically and lyrically, rock's poet laureate had hit his stride.

7. "The Joshua Tree" – U2 (1987)

U2 achieved the pinnacle of their signature sound on "The Joshua Tree."
A sound many bands have tried, and failed, to duplicate for two
decades. The Edge's moody, taut guitar, the pulsing rhythm section and
Bono's searching, yearning vocals all come together perfectly on such
songs as "Where the Streets Have No Name" and "I Still Haven't Found
What I'm Looking For."

8. "Pet Sounds" – The Beach Boys (1966)

A big step forward from surf music, Brian Wilson's lavish arrangements
provide just the right sound-scapes for these songs about the innocence
of youth, love and hope. The amazing harmonizing is still what lets you
know this is a Beach Boys album, but songs such as the hit "Wouldn't It
Be Nice" dug deeper than anything they had done before.

9. "Blonde on Blonde" – Bob Dylan (1966)

Rounding out Dylan's trifecta of electric greatness, "Blonde on Blonde"
was a final, double-album length burst of creativity. This sprawling
set of songs encompasses everything Dylan had done before and made it
all sound better. It also contains some of his best ballads, including
"Visions of Johanna," "Just Like a Woman" and "Sad Eyed Lady of the
Lowlands."

10. "Rubber Soul" – The Beatles (1965)

The Beatles at their most folksy and, up until this time, mature. Sure,
most of these songs are still about love, but there's a world of
experience in tracks like "Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown)," "I'm
Looking Through You" and "In My Life." The Beatles had turned a corner
by expanding their sound and deepening their lyrical content.


11. "Ten" – Pearl Jam (1991)

Along with "Smells Like Teen Spirit," "Alive" was the anthem that
exploded the Seattle music scene.

12. "Abbey Road" – The Beatles (1969)

The lads from Liverpool pull together one last time to perfectly wrap
up the '60s.

13. "Born to Run" – Bruce Springsteen (1975)

Captures the excitement and mythos of '70s arena rock at its peak.

14. "Blood on the Tracks" – Bob Dylan (1975)

On his first and best comeback, Dylan reminds us of his past glories.

15. "Revolver" – The Beatles (1966)

"Eleanor Rigby" and "Yellow Submarine" on the same album. How cool is
that?

16. "Led Zeppelin IV" – Led Zeppelin (1971)

On vinyl, side one ended with this little song called "Stairway to
Heaven," perhaps you've heard of it.

17. "Moondance" – Van Morrison (1970)

White soul has never sounded better than on this Irishman's classic.

18. "Exile on Main Street" – The Rolling Stones (1972)

The heaviest, murkiest and densest release of their career. Jagger's
vocals are practically indecipherable.

19. "Songs in the Key of Life" – Stevie Wonder (1976)

A creative explosion so potent it took 21 songs and 105 minutes to
contain it.

20. "Born in the U.S.A." – Bruce Springsteen (1984)

As the title suggests, it captures the American experience as well as
any album ever recorded.

21. "The Doors" – The Doors (1967)

A dark carnival of a record that perfectly represents the psychedelic
rock of the time.

22. "Who's Next" – The Who (1971)

The band's masterpiece, book-ended by "Baba O'Riley" and "Won't Get
Fooled Again."

23. "Purple Rain" – Prince (1984)

The height of his stardom and an Oscar winning soundtrack.

24. "Wish You Were Here" – Pink Floyd (1975)

As good a follow-up to "Dark Side of the Moon" as you could expect.

25. "Rumours" – Fleetwood Mac (1977)

Breaking up is hard to do, but easy to listen to on this masterpiece.

26. "London Calling" – The Clash (1980)

Sprawling, double-album opus is the point where punk matured.

27. "Pearl" – Janis Joplin (1971)

The ultimate female rock 'n' roll voice.

28. "Siamese Dream" – Smashing Pumpkins (1993)

Distinctive guitars made them the biggest band in the world for a while.

29. "Automatic for the People" – R.E.M. (1992)

Beautiful reflections on the sorrows of loss and joys of life

30. "White Blood Cells" – The White Stripes (2001)

Garage band breaks through with perfect blend of blues and Detroit City
rock.

31. "OK Computer" – Radiohead (1997)

The search for humanity in the computer age.

32. "What's Going On" – Marvin Gaye (1971)

Gaye ponders the moral dilemmas of the day and delivers beautiful soul.

33. "Appetite for Destruction" – Guns 'N Roses (1987)

Axl has an axe to grind, and Slash grinds his axe.

34. "Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs" – Derek and the Dominoes
(1970)

Clapton and Allman battle it out on guitars for our pleasure.

35. "Bringing It All Back Home" – Bob Dylan (1965)

Dylan plugs in and opens all kinds of doors.

36. "Imagine" – John Lennon (1971)

Title track is Lennon's signature tune for good reason.

37. "Let It Bleed" – The Rolling Stones (1969)

The Stones at their most assured; just listen to "Gimmie Shelter."

38. "Graceland" – Paul Simon (1986)

Simon finds his muse in the music of Soweto.

39. "Let It Be" – The Beatles (1970)

A sad but amazing farewell the greatest band ever.

40. "My Aim Is True" – Elvis Costello (1977)

A startling debut that has withstood the test of time.

41. "Elephant" – The White Stripes (2003)

Every bit as large as the animal it's named after.

42. "Exodus" – Bob Marley and the Wailers (1977)

Marley takes reggae to new heights.

43. " Back in Black" – AC/DC (1980)

A fitting toast to a departed friend.

44. "Beggars Banquet" – The Rolling Stones (1968)

The Stones bluesiest set of originals.

45. "Document" – R.E.M. (1987)

If the end of the world sounds this good, we'll all feel fine.

46. "Achtung Baby" – U2 (1991)

Presaged the electronic sound that became so prevalent during the '90s.

47. "In Utero" – Nirvana (1993)

Kurt Cobain does and doesn't cope with sudden fame.

48. "Love and Theft" – Bob Dylan (2001)

Not just anyone can record two of his best albums 26 years apart

49. "Music from Big Pink" – The Band (1968)

"The Weight" alone is worth the price of admission.

50. "Sign o' the Times" – Prince (1987)

Prince at his most diverse and a song-writing peak.

51. "The Wall" – Pink Floyd (1979)

52. "Plastic Ono Band" – John Lennon (1970)

53. "It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back" – Public Enemy
(1988)

54. "Tapestry" – Carole King (1971)

55. "Workingman's Dead" – The Grateful Dead (1970)

56. "The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars" –
David Bowie (1972)

57. "Blue" – Joni Mitchell (1971)

58. "1999" – Prince (1982)

59. "Van Lear Rose" – Loretta Lynn (2004)

60. "Vitalogy" – Pearl Jam (1994)

61. "The Band" – The Band (1969)

62. "Thriller" – Michael Jackson (1982)

63. "Synchronicity" – The Police (1983)

64. "Every Picture Tells a Story" – Rod Stewart (1971)

65. "The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill" – Lauryn Hill (1998)

66. "Burnin'" – Bob Marley and the Wailers (1973)

67. "Let's Get It On" – Marvin Gaye (1973)

68. "Led Zeppelin II" – Led Zeppelin (1969)

69. "Dookie" – Green Day (1994)

70. "Goodbye Yellow Brick Road" – Elton John (1973)

71. "Evil Empire" – Rage Against the Machine (1996)

72. "Vs." – Pearl Jam (1993)

73. "Stand!" – Sly and the Family Stone (1969)

74. "Magical Mystery Tour" – The Beatles (1967)

75. "Mermaid Avenue" – Billy Bragg and Wilco (1998)

76. "Desire" – Bob Dylan (1976)

77. "I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You" – Aretha Franklin (1967)

78. "Tommy" – The Who (1969)

79. "Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols" –Sex Pistols
(1977)

80. "Bookends" – Simon and Garfunkel (1968)

81. "Armed Forces" – Elvis Costello (1979)

82. "Help!" – The Beatles (1965)

83. "Surrealistic Pillow" – Jefferson Airplane (1967)

84. "To Bring You My Love" – PJ Harvey (1995)

85. "The Marshall Mathers LP" – Eminem (2000)

86. "Aftermath" – The Rolling Stones (1966)

87. "Mr. Tambourine Man" – The Byrds (1965)

88. "Sail Away" – Randy Newman (1972)

89. "Sticky Fingers" – The Rolling Stones (1971)

90. "I'm Still in Love with You" – Al Green (1972)

91. "Astral Weeks" – Van Morrison (1968)

92. "Is This It?" – The Strokes (2001)

93. "Superunknown" – Soundgarden (1994)

94. "Between the Buttons" – The Rolling Stones (1967)

95. "All That You Can't Leave Behind" – U2 (2000)

96. "Some Girls" – The Rolling Stones (1978)

97. "Franz Ferdinand" – Franz Fredinand (2004)

98. "Paul's Boutique" – Beastie Boys (1989)

99. "Melancholy and the Infinite Sadness" – Smashing Pumkins (1995)

100. "Déjà Vu" – Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young (1970)

101. "Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme" – Simon and Garfunkel (1966)

102. "Darkness on the Edge of Town" – Bruce Springsteen (1978)

103. "American Idiot" – Green Day (2004)

104. "The Chronic" – Dr. Dre (1992)

105. "The Clash" – The Clash (1977)

106. "Otis Blue/Otis Redding Sings Soul" – Otis Redding (1966)

107. "Diesel and Dust" – Midnight Oil (1988)

108. "Car Wheels on a Gravel Road" – Lucinda Williams (1998)

109. "The Who Sings My Generation" – The Who (1966)

110. "Remain in Light" – Talking Heads (1980)

111. "Odelay" – Beck (1996)

112. "The Basement Tapes" – Bob Dylan and The Band (1975)

113. "Green River" – Creedence Clearwater Revival (1969)

114. "Murmur" – R.E. M. (1983)

115. "Ramones" – The Ramones (1976)

116. "Dusty in Memphis" – Dusty Springfield (1969)

117. "This Year's Model" – Elvis Costello (1978)

118. "Cosmo's Factory" – Creedence Clearwater Revival (1970)

119. "Dirty Mind" – Prince (1980)

120. "I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got" – Sinead O'Connor (1990)

121. "The Velvet Underground" – The Velvet Underground (1969)

122. "We're Only in It for the Money" – Frank Zappa and the Mothers of
Invention (1968)

123. "After the Gold Rush" – Neil Young (1970)

124. "The Who Sell Out" – The Who (1967)

125. "Metallica" (The Black Album) – Metallica (1991)

126. "Nebraska" – Bruce Springsteen (1982)

127. "Yankee Hotel Foxtrot" – Wilco (2002)

128. "New York" – Lou Reed (1989)

129. "Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere" – Neil Young (1969)

130. "Out of Time" – R.E.M. (1991)

131. "Time Out of Mind" – Bob Dylan (1997)

132. "Straight Outta Compton" – N.W.A (1988)

133. "Doolittle" – The Pixies (1989)

134. "Monster" – R.E.M. (1994)

135. "Bring the Family" – John Hiatt (1987)

136. "The Smiths" – The Smiths (1984)

137. "The Unforgettable Fire" – U2 (1984)

138. "The Velvet Underground and Nico" – The Velvet Underground (1967)

139. "Natty Dread" – Bob Marley and the Wailers (1975)

140. "Tonight's the Night" – Neil Young (1975)

141. "Zen Arcade" – Husker Du (1984)

142. "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots" – Flaming Lips (2002)

143. "Rain Dogs" – Tom Waits (1985)

144. "Phrenology" – The Roots (2002)

145. "Freedom" – Neil Young (1989)

146. "Out of Our Heads" – The Rolling Stones (1965)

147. "Damn the Torpedoes" – Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers (1979)

148. "Superfly" – Curtis Mayfield (1972)

149. "Chutes Too Narrow" – The Shins (2003)

150. "Rum, Sodomy and the Lash" – The Pogues (1985)

151. "The Low End Theory" – A Tribe Called Quest (1991)

152. "Pleased to Meet Me" – The Replacements (1987)

153. "Swordfishtrombones" – Tom Waits (1983)

154. "Celebrity Skin" – Hole (1998)

155. "Dummy" – Portishead (1994)

156. "Quadrophenia" – The Who (1973)

157. "Hotel California" – The Eagles (1976)

158. "Definitely Maybe" – Oasis (1994)

159. "License to Ill" – Beastie Boys (1986)

160. "Ill Communication" – Beastie Boys (1994)

161. "Dirt" – Alice in Chains (1992)

162. "Electric Ladyland" – The Jimi Hendrix Experience (1968)

163. "The Harder They Come" soundtrack – various artists (1972)

164. "Willy and the Poor Boys" – Creedence Clearwater Revival (1969)

165. "Innervisions" – Stevie Wonder (1973)

166. "Lady Soul" – Aretha Franklin (1968)

167. "Fear of a Black Planet" – Public Enemy (1990)

168. "Stories From the City, Stories From the Sea" – PJ Harvey (2000)

169. "Court and Spark" – Joni Mitchell (1974)

170. "Rust Never Sleeps" – Neil Young (1979)

171. "Paul Simon" – Paul Simon (1972)

172. "Shoot Out the Lights" – Richard and Linda Thompson (1982)

173. "Daydream Nation" – Sonic Youth (1988)

174. "Forever Changes" – Love (1967)

175. "More Songs About Buildings and Food" – Talking Heads (1978)

176. "Suede" – Suede (1993)

177. "Pretenders" – The Pretenders (1980)

178. "Play" – Moby (1999)

179. "Dig Me Out" – Sleater-Kinney (1997)

180. "Entertainment!" – Gang of Four (1979)

181. "Let It Be" – The Replacements (1984)

182. "One Beat" – Sleater-Kinney (2002)

183. "The Battle of Los Angeles" – Rage Against the Machine (1999)

184. "Stankonia" – OutKast (2000)

185. "Different Class" – Pulp (1995)

186. "Houses of the Holy" – Led Zeppelin (1973)

187. "Let's Stay Together" – Al Green (1972)

188. "War" – U2 (1982)

189. "Mothership Connection" – Parliament (1976)

190. "Warren Zevon" – Warren Zevon (1976)

191. "Sublime" – Sublime (1996)

192. "Closer" – Joy Division (1981)

193. "3 Feet High and Rising" – De La Soul (1989)

194. "Exile in Guyville" – Liz Phair (1993)

195. "Cheap Thrills" – Big Brother and the Holding Company (1968)

196. "Face to Face" – The Kinks (1966)

197. "Vivid" – Living Colour (1988)

198. "Pretzel Logic" – Steely Dan (1974)

199. "Second Helping" – Lynyrd Skynyrd (1974)

200. "So" – Peter Gabriel (1986)

Re: List from Northwest U.S. Entertainment publication

God, it looks like a Rolling Stone list, only worse. There are TWO White Stripes' albums in the top 50?!

Re: List from Northwest U.S. Entertainment publication

Queen , Sting ...