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KBGS Old Boys' Forum

A place to discuss Keighley Boys' Grammar School. 


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KBGS Old Boys' Forum
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So called 'educational' visits

The Taylors Brewery notes reminded me of so called educational visits whilst at KBGS.
I recall visits to Calder Hall Atomic Power Station ( who was it that was sick on the bus? ), this was a regular one. I also remember trips to two steel making facilities, one was Samuel Fox at Stocksbridge nr Sheffield, and one to Consett Iron Works.
The Sheffield one also included a trip to a working water mill, and we were also taken up on a hill above Sheffield and gived a lesson on the Geography, I think it was A P Wilby.
At Fox's we were stood within inches of red hot bars of steel being extruded and flying past at a phenomenal rate, one of the workers lit his ******** it. Surely in todays world we would have been allowed so close. I also remember the Bessemer converter at Consett and red hot steel being poured out into ingot moulds.
But there must have been many more trips not reported yet???

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1958-1964

Current location (optional) Wirral

Re: So called 'educational' visits

I haven't any reminiscences about school trips...but I'm intrigued to know what the steel worker lit? Maybe you can post again with asterisks instead of the second and alternate letters, and we can all make an inspired guess. (PS: given that this site automatically censors 'rude' words and expresses them as asterisks - I'm expecting something good here. It would be a big disappointment, (although a sign of the times) if the web hosters had added 'cigarette' to their list of words worthy of censorship!!

Re: So called 'educational' visits

Once went to Bradford G.S. to see a play performed first in English, then in Latin, or vice versa.Truly inspirational.zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 58-66

Current location (optional) uk

Re: So called 'educational' visits

I mentioned this before somewhere, but here goes...The trek *** battle ( removing armbands from opposing army) led by the Art Teacher and another whose name I forget (Cullingford?) across Malham moors when it rained more or less incessantly. The Art teacher seemed to have missed out on the SAS or Sandhurst or being Che's right-hand man. The only solace I had was my soggy cold omelette sandwiches. Any other recollections of this?

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 58-66

Current location (optional) uk

Re: So called 'educational' visits

Very strange, the word I typed was Eff Ay Gee. A common word for cigarette, is this really a word that has been censored out??

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1958-1964

Current location (optional) Wirral

Re: So called 'educational' visits

What a shame, Brian. I had visions of a pyrotechnic display involving gaseous emissions.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 58-65

Re: So called 'educational' visits

So did I, Shaun (I take it you mean a phart)??

Re: So called 'educational' visits

Every day at school, away from backstreet Lawkholme, was an educational visit. In 1953, the whole school were ferried across Lord Street into the Ritz to watch "The Ascent of Everest". We would have preferred to watch the Stanley Matthew's final - but Nev was having nothing of that. But my first school "trip", apart from school team outings, was to Bradford to see "The Tempest" - our "O" Level set text - when we were in the 5th. We made our own way there on the 'bus, had a pint, and met up with Prut who had the tickets. He too looked as if he'd had a drop.In the 6th, Harry Blinks arranged for (made!) us go to Bradford GS to see performances of Moliere by "La Comedie Francaise" - touring UK with Pamela Anderson (sorry Sterling) as leading lady. His one omission was that he did not school us to laugh in the right places - like what the kids from the snmarter schools did. Arid stuff but improving (?). It was only at later levels of study that appreciation crept in.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1952-60

Current location (optional) Lincoln

Re: So called 'educational' visits

It’s surprising how many such visits were organised (and well organised)as well as leaving such a lasting impression.

I was talking in a similar vein with Peter Wilby just the other week. No-one died or was even injured (apart from poor old Ben in Namur) on the trips. Taking a 40-seater Bronte coach, full of excited young lads around engine sheds would be unthinkable in today’s ‘risk assessment’ mad-world. Yet 'Percy' Peart 'Danny' Dunthorne and 'Slim' Slater did just that many times every year. That was 'education'.

But back to the ‘educational visits’:

I remember having a tour of the Gas Works at Marley with ? Hemingway (the chemistry master) when in 2C. An absolutely fascinating place. What have we now on the site? Simply a set of valve heads. I wouldn’t like to see what’s under the tip where we used to play rugby on Wednesday afternoons - the lagoon at the side was bad enough!

Then there was the trip to Nairn-Williamson’s lino works in Lancaster, organised by ? Bamber in the summer of 1962 followed by a visit to the Fun Fair in Morecambe. Still there in my memory.

But the ‘educational trips’ to end all ‘educational trips’ must surely have been those organised by Ben Trenouth.

The only one I was fortunate-enough to enjoy was the marathon journey by rail to Naples via Folkestone, Calais, overnight to Basel in couchette accommodation, then Stresa (one night), Milan (lunch) only to sit on wooden seats to Rome (got into the wrong carriage - don’t know whose fault it was, only to discover that we should have been in a German carriage with foam seats about 15 minutes from journey’s end). 4 or 5 nights in Rome, in a catholic seminary, then down to the luxury of a hotel in Naples where we visited Solfratara, Herculaneum, Pompeii, Vesuvius and the unforgettable boat journey to Capri in what must have been a Force 8 gale (so strong that the boat couldn’t turn round for fear of being capsized!). Stood outside on the deck with Wilbur and several others singing all the way! Back in Naples, got stoned (literally by the ‘street urchins who used the ballast from the tram tracks as ammunition).Then back to Milan; the roof of the cathedral - La Scala followed by a visit to see ‘The Last Supper’.

Then home. Excellent (and unbelievable) value for, was it £35?

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 59-66

Current location (optional) Embsay

Re: So called 'educational' visits

Indeed a wonderful trip David, and of course we have both posted some photos on it.
Yes that trip to Capri was horrendous, I was one of just a few who didnt 'bring forth'. I remember a Frenchman shouting 'Tout est perdu'(or maybe it was in the plural). No chance of getting to the Blue Grotto on a rowing boat!

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1958-1964

Current location (optional) Wirral

Re: So called 'educational' visits

I have been looking back over ‘subjects’ covered by correspondents in years gone by. The early ones were posted long before I became interested in the KBGS site. This one, ‘Educational Visits’ took my eye and I thought I would recount an incident which took place on the one and only educational visit I can ever remember. I was at school during the austerity years and suppose there wasn’t the money around to splash out on extra mural activities. But I smile whenever I think of the one and only time I went on an educational visit. George Harrison, our form master and English teacher, took the form to a performance of Macbeth at Bingley Little Theatre. We were studying Macbeth in preparation for our forthcoming School Certificate exam in English literature. I remember it being a happy occasion. We were seated a few rows back from the stage in the stalls. All went well until a scene which takes place In Macbeth’s bedroom - if my memory serves me correctly. There comes a time when Macbeth, preparing for bed, instructs his servant to “Ring the bell when my posset is ready”. A little later, when Macbeth was walking near to his bed, from off stage we heard a ‘ting ting’. Macbeth’s posset was clearly ready. But a member of our form clearly interpreted the sound otherwise. And in a loud voice, clearly heard by most of the patrons of the evenings performance, he uttered the words “ He’s kicked t’bloody piss pot”. The house dissolved in laughter and George Harrison’s face, normally quite dark, became as black as thunder. He was non too pleased! Henceforth, we always equated the word posset as being synonymous with the word chamber pot!

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1945 - 50

Current location (optional) Norfolk

Re: So called 'educational' visits

Brilliant.

Current location (optional) Tasmania

Re: So called 'educational' visits

Thank you Mike. Glad you found my little story amusing. I never cease to grin whenever I think of that never to be forgotten evening.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1945 - 50

Current location (optional) Norfolk

Re: So called 'educational' visits

Woz Sinkepatin Sandy educatshenal? The bloak oo chargd a tanner? t'fowks t'sitin t'theater nex t'bustashen abart 1954 twotch im non stop tinklin. Dint see no bukit next t'peeana. Inuf manglin!

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1953-58

Current location (optional) Tykeland