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Re: Long lost publichouses

Although I'm sure there'll be a clamour of helpful advice re this subject I'll make a start re extinct pubs in the middle of town.I remember the Kings Arms between the top of Low St and the Lord Rodney, on the area now cleared and grassed.The Black Horse was round the corner in Low St.The Wellington on Hanover St and there was another down Low St on the right(Hare and Hounds?) The Bradford Arms( a favourite for under-agers in my time) along a street off Low St.The Queens Hotel on Station Bridge and the Ship near the junction of West Lane and Oakworth Rd.
Oh and of course the Boltmakers is still there in East Parade.

Re: Long lost publichouses

Geoff Walker. Michael Maude, Ray Land, David Baldwin, John Ackroyd and myself had a reunion in the Boltmakers just after Xmas. If you want to partake of a pint of Taylors pay the Boltmakers a call, you will not be disappointed.
The Devonshire Arms on the corner of High Street and Church Green is now the K2 and it has a night club attached where Streamline Taxis use to operate from. In previous times it was a livery stables.
Further round "The Green" you will find the Commercial (The Comic)and the Red Pig (can't remember it's original name)and across the road is The Lord Rodney. Up South Street and into Halifax Road - King's Arms, Woolpack, Vine (landlord Alan Cowling Ex KBGS)Hope & Anchor, Worth Valley and Great Northern.
The Black Horse in Low Street is now Ethel Austins which of course is not a pub!!

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) d.r.boddy@btinternet.com

New pub names irritate

The loss of traditional pub names continues apace. It's not just renaming of pubs with names like 'Q Bar' or the 'Liquid Lounge' but other apparently pub sounding names. By this I mean 'The Slug and Lettuce' or the 'Pig and Whistle'. The lack of local history attached to these names and the lack of geographical relevance is becoming all too clear. I think it's a cause English Heritage or local council planners should take on board.

Re: Long lost publichouses

Referring to Dave Boddys message, it was I think the Kings Head rather than Kings Arms in Halifax Rd at bottom of Goulbourne St, and there was another very small one nearby called the Friendly Arms.

The Kings Head was probably the one I frequented most when I first started drinking. It sold Hammonds Ale. Now defunct I think. Which lead nicely on to other defunct brews like 'Ramsdens Stone Trough Ales' and 'Whitakers Cock o'the North Ales'. Also I thinkBYB 'Bentleys Yorkshire Beers' is also now taken over or defunct.
Three cheers for Tetleys, Websters, Taylors (particularly) and Goose Eye Brewery is still going.

Re: Long lost publichouses

King's Head - yes! Friendly Arms - no, it was the Friendly Inn.

Re: Long lost publichouses

What about The Ship at the bottom of West Lane? Demolished in about 1967.

Re: Long lost publichouses

oops. It's been mentioned already.

Re: Long lost publichouses

Whilst we're at it, down Cavendish Street we have the Volunteers Arms (top of Lawkholme Lane)and the Cavendish next door, and at the bottom the Victoria Hotel. Turn left down Bradford Road the Eastwood Tavern. Turn right up East Parade and left down Coney Lane another fine Taylor's house The Cricketers. Carry on Coney Lane and on the corner of Coney Lane and Parkwood Street is The Globe. The Grapes on High Street has had a refurb and now trades under the name The Gatehouse (far cry from the Grapes). Finally we have the Brown Cow at the bottom of West Lane and The Reservoir (Res) half way up West Lane. Sorry forgot the Albert on Bridge Street and the Royal Oak on Damside. Oops there's what we can remember as The Mason's Arms opposite Morrisons on Worth Way. That's changed it's name so many times I don't think anyone knows what it is called. If I've missed any I am sure one of you alchoholic's out there will let us know.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) d.r.boddy@btinternet.com

Re: Long-lost public houses.

The Grapes, prior to its revamp and change of name was, how shall I put it, a haunt of ladies wearing sensible shoes. The last time I went to the Wellington, the barmaid was changing a baby with a very dirty nappy on the bar top. Didn't stay for a drink.
Does anyone remember the awful psychedelic mural in the Albert?

The mural

That mural in the Albert was painted by Malcolm Berry. Many people have appreciated it over the years. Only a philistine would fail to see its true artistic merit. There has been talk of it been placed in the Tate Modern. It was painted whilst Berry was at Leeds College of Art.

a masterpiece

I agree it is nothing short of a masterpiece. I believe it is entitled 'Conundrum', one of Malcolm Berry's finest works. Is it still hanging there? It was once reviewed in 'Yorkshire Life' by their art critic.

Re: Long-lost public houses.

I don't think we are discussing the same work. The psychedelic one I refer to was definitely not painted by M Berry RA. It was in the room on the right as you go through the front door, featured flying saucers and monsters and was perpetrated in the early seventies by Crossroads' first acid casualty, not a KBGS old boy, but a cousin of one well known to Mr Butler.

Mr Berry

What was the name of Malcolm Berry's pal from Crosshills who had equally long hair. Was one of the original 'mods' at KBGS/Oakbank. I believe his name began with a 'D'. Since when was Mr Berry elevated to the Royal Academy.

Re: Long lost publichouses

Getting back to the original topic,wasn't there a pub half way up Halifax Rd at Hermits Hole?Cant remember the name.Also I note that the "Cav" is currently available to let if anyone is looking for an exciting and challenging business opportunity.

Re: Long lost publichouses

Yes Brian there was a pub up Halifax Road. It has long been closed down. It may even have been called Hermit Hole.
4 more I forgot. The Burlington Arms and the Market Arms on Market Street next to the Parish Church, The Gardeners Arms on Hanover Street, and The Star on North Street. The Wellington on Hanover Street closed several years ago.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) d.r.boddy@btinternet.com

Re: Long lost publichouses

Don't recall a pub at Hermit Hole, but I have hazy memories of playing snooker in a Conservative Club up there. Whether the haziness is due to the considerable time that has elapsed since or due to the refreshments on offer at the time I am unsure.
There's another "long lost". Where are all the pubs with snooker tables?

Re: Long lost publichouses

Back to the original post:

The pub behind the Parish Church was the Market Arms - still there I believe.

Then what about 'The Bradford Arms' on Bradford Street - backing up against the wall of electricity distribution station - originally a Hammond's house.

Then half-way down Low Street there was 'The Hare and Hounds' - strange pub with a central bar, from memory, but a great stained glass window in the lobby (proudly pronounncing 'A Hey's House') with great swing-doors on either side.

Has anyone mentioned the 'Black Horse' higher up Low Street? This used to be on the corner of the road which ran across the bottom of the original market where Gilbert Wilson's fish stall was located.

The pub in Hermit Hole, was it the White Horse? Anyway, after it had closed down Reggie Newton (of the swap-shop near the Hope & Anchor) bought it and converted it into a house.

Any more?

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) david.baldwin666@btopenworld.com

Current location (optional) www.maverickeurope.com

Re: Long lost publichouses

Sorry Dave (Boddy), I forgot to mention the one in Church Street (Green) which is now the Red Pig and was 'The Fountain'. Another old 'Taylor's' house which was sold-off before the rest of the world came to appreciate their brews.

'Landlord' was only brewed for one or two club outlets served by Taylors in the 60's but could also be sampled on certain occasions at 'The Albert'.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) david.baldwin666@btopenworld.com

Current location (optional) www.maverickeurope.com

Re: Long lost publichouses

Landlord is sold in pubs in mid-Kent. Though not quite as tasty as in the Keighley area. Is there a better Taylors pub than the Fleece at Haworth. Nearly every single Taylors brew on offer. Though the renovations have been less than sympathetic.

Re: Long lost publichouses

The Market Arms. Yes! Thanks David. And it's still there is it? I must go and find it - let's hope it hasn't been "improved" since the old days.
Back then I heard tell of lads on under-age jaunts to pubs who encountered members of staff, and of the very different reactions this precipitated.
Never experienced this myself though. I suppose I drank in places that were too select.

Re: Long lost publichouses

There may have been a Bradford Arms in Keighley but to my certain knowledge it wasn't in Bradford Street at least not before I left there in 1964. The nearest pub for the Bradford Street populace was The Eastwood Tavern - now there's a pub! Originally, it was an Aaron King (?) house but more recently Tim Taylors.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) terrymarston@hotmail.com

Re: Long lost publichouses

Yes Jonathan I used to think there was no better pint of Taylors than the one produced by the Fleece. But as previously mentioned The Boltmaker's Arms down East Parade beats it.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) d.r.boddy@btinternet.com

Re: Long lost publichouses

No Terry, not the Bradford Street where you used to live but the one which used to run close to, and parallel with, the route of Worth Way today.

It must have been somewhere near the current site of Colin Appletayd's motor cycle shop and was popular with under-age drinkers as no questions were aked.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) david.baldwin666@btopenworld.com

Current location (optional) www.maverickeurope.com

Re: Long lost publichouses

Just remembered that 'The Burlington Arms' used to be next to 'The Market Arms'. Is that still there also?

Better watch-out though Shaun, the son of a friend walked into The Market Arms after a Young Farmers meeting last year and straight into a punch which wasn't intended for him.

His broken jaw and teeth are doing OK now!

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) david.baldwin666@btopenworld.com

Current location (optional) www.maverickeurope.com

Re: Long lost publichouses

A different Market Arms from the one I recall. The pub games were not as physical then.

Re: Long lost publichouses

Yes The Burlington Arms is still there, virtually next door to The Market Arms.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) d.r.boddy@btinternet.com

Re: Long lost publichouses

Of course we mustnt forget the Turkey out at Goose Eye, which has its own brewery next door.
Incidentally if anyone is in Headingley area there is a new wine bar (Arcadia) right underneath my office (near post office) which has the biggest range of draught and bottled beers you could imagine. The only one that really sells well (so they keep it on all the time) is Taylors Landlord. Sometimes thay also have Goose Eye beer.

Re: Long lost publichouses

Indeed Brian! Arcadia looks rather like one of the wine bars for poseurs from the outside, but you have rightly identified the jewel within...... AND it's NO SMOKING.

Re: Long lost publichouses

In the sixth form, we used to favour pubs with football tables. There was a Hammond's pub (name now escapes me)situated roughly on the land that now houses either Morrison's or the Market. It was a fine area with cobbled streets and stone buildings, although by the mid sixties a lot of the buildings around the pub had gone. Anyway, the public bar had a fine footy table, and the landlord was pleased to see the stripey blazers in there for a pint and a game after school. The Marquis of Granby had a table too. One of the locals was a guy who had no fingers. But he could produce massive spin with his wrists and the remnants of his thumbs. He and his pals used to delight in 'grannying' the opposition. If you wanted to challenge the current victors to a game you had to 'put a knock on', which meant putting your shilling on the table to let the losers of the current game know they had to move over. Anybody else remember the footy table wizard..?? I'll bet he's still knocking around Keighley, unlike the football tables, which will have given way to gaming machines. Come to think of it, I think the table in the Granby went when they introduced those 'table tennis' games, which involved a black and white screen, two short vertical straight lines (the bats) and a horizontal line (the ball) which you pinged back and forth to the accompaniment of a fairly realistic ping-pong sound effect. If you ask me, this was the start of a slippery slope that led to global warming. Simple as that! The world was a far better place with footy machines.

Re: Long lost publichouses

Being a regular in the Granby for quite a few years I remember the football table in the tap room.The chap referred to was called Jack Craven.His parents owned a shop opposite Angus's garage on Bradford Rd.We actually played in a Keighley and District league and I partnered Jack in games at the Bradford Arms, the Wellington the Albert etc.Dont think we lost too many either, although the locals could get a bit hostile.

Re: Long lost publichouses

Respect!

Re: Long lost publichouses

The Granby was one of the first pubs to have a juke box. It was the "in" place in the late 60's

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) d.r.boddy@btinternet.com

Re: Long lost publichouses

What about the Roebuck at Utley? The enigmatic French landlord, Pierre DuVal, gaunt and invariably immaculately attired. A good place for under age drinking, very handy for St Marks Youth Club across the road. When it closed at half past ten, as pubs used to do, you could hop on a bus and squeeze a pint in at Steeton (where they closed at 11) prior to a leisurely stroll across the valley to Silsden.

Re: Long lost publichouses

Back to my original query.
I am really heartened to see that very few of the Keighley pubs appear to have vanished completely.
Correspondents have so far identified 37 pubs in the borough [of which I recall visiting 25 in my youth]. Judging by his postings I reckon David Boddy has visited many more.
Re; Dave Baldwin's posting about the pub at Hermit Hole - Yes, it was called The White Horse Inn. As a regular visitor to the Amateurs [KAOS] it amused me to imagine this pub at Hermit Hole as the backdrop when the chorus. dressed in Lederhosen, launched into "The White Horse Inn".
But what of my father's 169 pubs? Was he exaggerating, or have we really failed to identify 132 of them?

Re: Long lost publichouses

The Foresters, Oakworth. Closed about 1970/71. Just down the road from the Fleece.

Re: Long lost publichouses

Incidentally, underaged drinking was of course 'de riguer' for most of the socially adventurous chaps at KBGS -- but I think generally it started at 16 at the earliest. Unless anybody knows different. The first time I did it at 16 I did feel feel a bit like I was going to be arrested at any moment! These days of course you are lucky to be arrested for having 20 'aslylum seekers' in the back of your van, or 20 kilos of heroin.

Re: Long lost publichouses

The pub at Hermit Hole was, as Dave Baldwin thought, the White Horse. AFAIR (as far as I remember) it closed because it was always damp - it butted onto the hillside. Later it became the offices of a damp proofing company...

The Kings Arms was on the left hand side of Church Green just before the Rodney. I never went in there - too young to get away with it. Do you remember the other quaint shops on the left hand side? I remember a second hand jewelers or some such. I think ther might have been a tobaconists there too.

Has anyone mentioned the Queen Street Arms? Locally known as the Grinning Rat. Supposedly because a lodger defaulting on his rent barricaded himself in his room and grinned at the people through the window.

Of course there was King's brewery on Cooke Lane.

Jonathan, the Boltmakers sells most of the Taylors range, kept in fine condition too. It changed hands on the 17th Jan. The beer is still as good.

The Market and the Burlington were always pubs to be avoided. The Rodney in contrast was a quite swish pub, especially the newer extension at the back. Its pretty grim now.

Was there a Whitakers pub in the middle of Keighley? That is besides the Hope and Anchor.

Re: Long lost publichouses

Yes, Bill. There was a Whitaker's pub in the centre and a tasty pint it served too. Though a moderately frequent visitor all those years ago, I can't recall its' name either. I think it was somewhere not far from the Cosy Corner Picture House.
And the Grinning Rat - thanks for the info. on its' real name, which I never knew, and the story behind it.
And as for the Market and Burlington - never had any problems there in the sixties though The Market sounds a bit iffy nowadays!

Re: Long lost publichouses

500 hits in 2 weeks - does this mean that hostelries are of particular interest to many ex-KBGS students? Or is it simply that they are an abiding passion for a few?

Re: Long lost publichouses

It does look as though this subject has proved of great interest to most of us.Just thought I'd mention that whilst sitting in Wilsden Main St(Yes they still have Road Works ) I noticed that the Brewers Arms has closed.Looks like its being turned into a retirement home for anyone interested.

Re: Long lost publichouses

"...a retirement home for anybody interested.."?? If you're interested, you probably don't need one yet!

Re: Long lost publichouses

Right, good thinking.Respect etc.

Re: Long lost publichouses

What was the name of the pub next to the Parish Church (left hand side when facing the church) opposite the 'Rodney' which was demolished at the same time as the Kings Arms, and next to the alley which ran down the side of the church yard to the covered market?

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) david.baldwin@maverickeurope.com

Current location (optional) www.maverickeurope.com

Re: Long lost publichouses

Heres a few more:

The Angel on Turkey Street
The New Inn on Turkey Street
The Sun on Westgate
The Bay Horse on Westgate
The Bridge on Bridge Street
The Malt Shovel on West Lane

Ok I cheated a little - got a look at a map of 1878 Keighley in the Brown Cow today.

I think thats the only way that we'll get anywhere near the total first mentioned by Sean.

Before you ask - Turkey Street was on the right hand side of the Brown Cow. Westgate went somewhere near the sorting office from the (Upper Green?) congregational chapel towards (old) Oakworth Road. That whole area, Quebec bridge etc was a mass of slums. Presumably Greengates would have had its share of pubs too.

I've still had no luck in naming the Whitakers pub down Low Street. Does the Fleece strike a bell with anyone?

Cheers!

Re: Long lost publichouses

The Fleece certainly existed somewhere in town - a work colleague of my father used to drink there regularly (and frequently), though I don't recall ever going there myself ... unless, of course, that was the pub near the Parish Church at the end of the alleyway.
The area at the bottom of Oakworth Road was notorious, though the slums had gone before my memories started to register. Apparently the slums consisted of a jumble of 1 up 1 down houses with water supplied by a communal tap and a sewage system that either didn't work or didn't exist. My father was, for a time, an insurance man and part of his round covered that area. Premiums were collected on a weekly basis but, in that area, collections were haphazaed at best. Perhaps that's why he was never robbed - the area was a crime hotspot. My grandfather was in the police and he told stories of a virtual no-go area where police never went alone. My earliest recollections are of a wasteland running down to the beck.
I wonder if those who attended KBGS before Bill Bracewell and I have memories of the area before it was demolished. Maybe they can confirm some of the information that Bill happened upon.

Re: Long lost publichouses

Was the Whitaker's house down Low Street The Hare & Hounds?
I can remember the houses down Damside, off Oakworth Road. They were demolished to build the high rise flats. One old chap refused to move until the bulldozer driver knocked on his door.
The area which is now occupied by the Post Office was known as the Pinfold.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) d.r.boddy@btinternet.com

Re: Long lost publichouses

Yes - the Pinfold. I remember the tone in my grandfather's voice when he mentioned it.
Apparently,in the pre-industrial era there had been a well-fenced area for keeping livestock in overnight to ensure their safety [the pinfold] - the "fold" bit referred to the secure area, what the "pin" bit meant I don't know. Possibly it came from the word "pen". I believe a small fee was paid to the guardian of the pinfold who was known as the Pinder.
In Wakefield, Pinderfields Hospital is on the sight of the old "Pinder's fields".
Keighley sounds quite bucolic in those days!

Re: Long lost publichouses

My mother too had a special tone of voice for "t'pinfold". It was synonymous with slum in her speech. I always assumed a pinfold was a slum until I became better enlightened - but not until I had left Keighley. The pinder was the man in the feudal village with the job of rounding up the stray animals and keeping them in the pinfold until the owner paid for their release. The Oxford Dictionary suggests "pin" has the same root as "pound". The area around the National School at the bottom of Oakworth Road was built up. The housing with cobbled streets was as described by Shaun . My elder sister married in 1955 and briefly rented a house in West Leeds Street - off Oakworth Road. It had one up and one down and a cellar. The rent was ten bob a week. I used to visit them on a Thursday night. The walk home back to Lawkholme was invariably a sprint until I got as far as The Cross.When I worked in the bus garage, I used to meet John Topham at dinner time in The Grapes (a Hammonds House)in High Street. There was another pub almost next door called The Ship (I think). We occasionally dined in the Market Cafe where they kept a mean botlle of brown sauce and supped ale in The Market Tavern. There was a Taylor's pub up Aireworth (?) Street in the shadow of the flats built there. It would be a point of interest to recall the many breweries with ale houses in the town. Not so far mentioned were Ramsden's (Stone Trough) Ales, Bentley's Yorkshire Brewery (BYB), Hey's Gold Cup Ales.What was the pub at the end of Goulbourne St - and who's ale did it sell?

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) terrymarston@hotmail.com

Re: Long lost publichouses

The pub at the bottom of Goulbourne Street, opposite the Cooperative Ironworks, was the King's Head [mentioned on a couple of occasions in earlier postings]. I'm pretty sure it sold Hammonds Ales ... and a very pleasant evening was to be had there playing darts or cribbage or talking to the 'regulars' in the Tap Room. One of these was Maggie, who never bought a drink. She collected glasses [unofficially] and returned them to the bar. As compensation customers bought her the occasional half, of mild I think it was.
They also had Jubilee Stout which, when combined with the bitter, produced the best 'Black and Tan' ever tasted.

Lower Oakworth Rd

In the Pubs thread, there seems to be correspondance about the Lower Oakworth Rd area.
I had a great Aunt lived in Broom St, off Aireworth St, and where the 3 high rise blocks were built. She moved to a flat up West Lane. I recall Darrell Camm was one of the first occupants of the High Rise, Quebec House (anyone remember the names of the two others). It was quite grotty round there. Moving up Oakworth Rd a bit, my Great Grandmother (Mother of aforementioned aunt) lived at 8 Croft Street. These were back to back houses, lighting was by gas mantle. I was sent to buy them at Tommy Holmes (Peters father) shop just across and slightly higher up Oakworth Rd, although there was also a corner shop at the corner of Croft Street. I suppose Croft Street was more or less opposite Hillworth Lodge. Whilst on Oakworth Rd, my mother was born in the middle one of the three cottages next ter t'Oxfadall.

Re: Long lost publichouses

Everyone seems to have forgotten the Gardeners and the Welly on Hanover Street

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) ray.land@lineone.net

Re: Long lost publichouses

David Boddy mentioned the Gardeners' on 27th January - given his extensive knowledge of hostelries in Keighley I would have been surprised if such a quality pub [it certainly was such in the sixties] had escaped his scrutiny.

Re: Long lost publichouses

Just remembered the Hare and Hound down Low Street

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) ray.land@lineone.net

Re: Long lost publichouses

He got the Wellington too - same date.
Nothing escapes the amn.

Re: Long lost publichouses

And Dave Baldwin, clearly another great student of the art, got the Hare and Hounds too [Feb 2nd I think].

Re: Long lost publichouses

How about the pub at Hermit Hole.The White Horse

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) ray.land@lineone.net

Re: Long lost publichouses

Brian Mechen - 26th Jan.

Re: Long lost publichouses

Ian Dewhirst's book " A History of Keighley" makes reference to the following pubs.In Chuch St.the Devonshire Arms,Hole in the Wall,Kings Arms,Rodney and the Sun.In Low St.,the Fleece,Hare and Hounds,Mason's Arms and Black Horse.The Fleece and Masons Arms are shown on a map from 1849 on the righthand side going up.On the map there is also the Golden Lion opposite the Black Horse.
Incidentally the Free Grammar School is shown towards the end of Cook Lane opposite College St.

Re: Long lost publichouses

I made previous mention of the Conservative Club near Ingrow Bridge but have just remembered another club - the Kensington Club. Sounds like some very posh place in London but it was actually in a pre-fab on Kensington Street near Holycroft School. They had good, cheap beer (can't recall the brewery) and a magnificent snooker table.
Though many excellent pubs have suffered "improvement" the clubs have often preserved real quality. Is the Ken still there with it's snooker table?

Re: Long lost publichouses

The Kensington Club closed several years ago and was turned into a Keep Fit Club. For my sins I was the resident organist at The Ken Club for quite a few years back in the mid 1970's. Other clubs in Keighley included The Low Mill Lane Social club (now Chrome nightclub)at the top of Low Mill Lane, The East Ward Con club (derelict)at the top of Dalton Lane. The Worth Village Club (now Milners blinds) - I was resident organist there in the early 1970's. Who can remember the strippers on Sunday lunch? Come on own up.The Beaconsfield Cycling Club(?) and The Workers Club at the bottom of Low Street(Was turned into a nightclub called Oscars- Now top floor derelict, Lower floor some sort of Youth Club). Ingrow Con Club, Grafton Club on Oakworth Road, Liberal Club on Lord Street and the Pop & Pasty opposite Victoria Park still exist.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) d.r.boddy@btinternet.com

Club Names

I like the idea of a 'Kensington Club' in Keighley. What about a 'Carlton Club' club in Lawkeholme Lane or a 'Garrick Club' in Cavendish Street. Or even an 'Athaenium Club' on the Guard House Estate -- if such a place still exists. In reality, 'The Keighlians Club' -- of Gilbert Swift fame next to the school -- was as upmarket as things are likely to get in central Keighley.

Current location (optional) Okells Brewery

Re: Long lost publichouses

Back to pubs, but a few a little out of town.

I recall drinking in the Guide which is clearly visible on the hill from most parts of town.
Also the Grouse above Oakworth (Taylors!) and even further on the 'Herders'
Wasnt there one near Stanbury called the Silent Inn or similar?
Also the Waggon and Horses on the way out of 'Oxnap' going up Cock Hill. I also visited one above Leeming on the road between 'Oxnap' and Denholme, Anyone remember its name?
Of course there were several hostelries in OAkworth Haworth and 'Oxnap'

Re: Long lost publichouses

I think the pub Brian refers to is The Lamb. The pub near Stanbury is the Old Silent and the 2 pubs in Stanbury are The Wuthering Heights and The Friendly.
Pubs in Haworth are The Royal Oak-opposite the railway station(closed due to flooding) Starting in Main Street going up. The Fleece, The Black Horse, The Kings Arms The White Lion and The Sun.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) d.r.boddy@btinternet.com

Re: Long lost publichouses

Truly, David Boddy is a man after my own pint.

Re: Long lost publichouses

Don Wilding ex-KBGS pupil introduced me to black and tans at the Kings Head on Hfx Rd.We used to go to Lund Park Y.C on a Sat.night About eight thirty Don gave us the signal and off we all went to play darts in the Snug. We always ended up with the other youth clubbers for land and sea at the Oxford Hall fisheries.

Re: Long lost publichouses

Ah yes , happy days, John. But did we really skive off to the Kings Head as early as 8.30? As referred to earlier it was Hammonds Ale.

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

Brian, you might be right. It could have been nine/ish. Did we go with Shaun? I know there was a few of us.I remember slinking into the Goulborne! St side entrance and the smell of beer.

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

Back to a topic dear to many hearts.
Since the site got mangled by some bright spark this thread has largely disintegrated so forgive me if this has already been said elsewhere - I think that the pub at Hermit Hole was called The White Horse. I suppose it's long gone but will look next time I'm in the vicinity.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 58-65

Current location (optional) Leeds

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

Seeing that I am now credited with being the Author of this thread(not true of course) I can confirm that there have been a number of postings giving the name of this long gone pub as The White Horse.I wouldn't have known the name and wonder whether it was more commonly refered to as The Hermit Hole.In much the same way The Fleece above Eldwick was always called Dick Hudsons.

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

Developing the feel for pubs coming late with me, my favourite pub was the Res(ervoir) which had a little cubby-hole with counter where they'd sell you crisps.I went in the Vic a few times while still at school, at the bottom of Cavendish Street (or was it called the Cavendish?). Never had I until then seen so many tight-skirted, big-breasted females all in one place...looking ready got action, if I'm not being presumptuous.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 58-66

Re: Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

The above post appears to be the only one left Shaun.

Do you want to try to start it again?

Here's some for starters:

The Bradford Arms (Hammonds) - used to back onto the YEB, roughly where Sunwin Motors stands now.

The Hare and Hounds (Heys) - used to be opposite the end of Hanover Street where Morrisons (Morrison's) car park now stands.

The Herders (free house) - on the road to Laneshaw Bridge. Now split into two buildings one of which is a house whilst the roadside building looks to be derelict.

What was the one in the terrace (The Friendly?) on the left hand side going out of Lane Ends, Oakworth?

The Kings Arms - on Church Street - demolished in the 60's and now a grassed area.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 59 - 66

Current location (optional) Embsay

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

The Black Horse (Ramsdens I believe) near the top of Low Street on the market side was a pub I was too fleared to go in. I liked Ramsdens ales (Halifax?) but the noise and the measure of the regulars were intimidating. I ventured into the Gardeners in Hanover (?) Street and the "Grinning Rat" which if I recall corectly was near the gasworks yard in Adelaide Street (?) Corrections from current resident old boys much appreciated.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 52-60

Current location (optional) Lincoln

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

Ramsdens' brewery stood on the site currently occupied by the main offices of Halifax B.S., near the town centre. I worked there on three occasions during summer holidays from university (1965/6/7). At the time, the company had been acquired by Tetleys, and brewed only "Best" - a type of golden coloured mild ale. Very palatable, I can confirm having sampled it to excess on an almost daily basis. It must have been, we turned out 1400 barrels a week!

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 58-65

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

Many thanks to Dave for reviving this dead thread.
The Herders' that you mention was a great spot for a quiet pint but has been closed for a few years. My occasional stop-offs were halted about 4 years ago. I think there was initially an effort to sell it as a pub; then an effort to sell it as anything. It seemed to be completely abandoned and was being allowed to drift into dereliction when I last passed.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 58-65

Current location (optional) leeds

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

I cannot remeber the pubs of Keighley, but there was a brewery, I think it was somewhere near Low Street ? The stench from that place put me off my first taste of ale for many years !

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 43/47

Current location (optional) Steeton, now West Wales

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

Ramsdens were known as Ramsdens 'Stone Trough Ales', and Whittakers as 'Cock o' the North' ales. Where was Whittakers, or is it somewhere else on this thread ?
Came over 'Herders' yesterday - definitely closed.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 58-64

Current location (optional) Wirral

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

Funny, John. I always enjoyed the "aroma". What amused me as a lad was that the brewery was either adjacent or very close to the Salvation Army citadel on the end of Cooke Lane - almost in the Bus Station. I believe the brewer was Aaron King. One of their houses was the Eastwood Tavern in Bradford Road on the fringes of Bug Alley - just opposite the bottom of Bingley Street. On a visit there in the 80s, I had occasion to pay a call - my, the gents was something to behold - each individual urinal was a private kingdom - all that could be seen was the back of your head and the seat of your pants - a huge series of porcelain structures about 6'6" tall and 2 foot wide - a right royal p##s. They were worthy of inclusion in a museum . I called in a few years later - and would you adamandeve it- they'd been "modernised" with some pokey little p##s 'oiles not worth pointing percy at. Sic transit gloria monday! (Yes - I know!)

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 52-60

Current location (optional) Lincoln

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

Brian, Whitakers' brewery was also close to Halifax town centre. The road to Keighley from the roundabout at the end of the "fly over" (built in the 70s) passes directly through the former brewery site before proceding up the bank towards Ovenden, Illingworth and Denholm.
Halifax, in fact, boasted three breweries of significant size, the third being Websters' of course, which was some distance out of the town in the Pellon/Mixenden area and closed only a few years ago.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 58-65

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

Terry,
Eastwood Tavern now up for sale !!

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 50 - 55

Current location (optional) Keighley

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

A very long thread so forgive me if I missed it, but did anyone remember the Bridge Inn at the bottom of Stockbridge Hill or The Busfeild (yes, that's how they spell it) Arms at Morton?

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 51-58

Current location (optional) Cottingham

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

I had a couple of beers at the Busfeild at Morton a few years ago, and when Keighley was flooded a couple or more years ago I recognised the Bridge Inn on our TV news in NZ and wrote to the Kly News at the time. Cheers

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 47-51

Current location (optional) Auckland NZ

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

Passed the 'Eastwood Tavern' this morning and it looks like it's going to be a double-glazed window showroom in the near future.

Another one bites the dust ......

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 59-66

Current location (optional) Embsay (but not much longer)

Re: Long lost publichouses

Proper Pubs don't have juke boxes.
A similar distinction.....
A former colleague of mine, whose dad had been Mayor of Harrogate, (to his eternal shame) recounted drinking in a boozer in down town Harrogate. A yuppee type came in and ordered a pint and then supplemented it with a request for a bag of crisps.

The licensee replied - Its a pub - not an effing restaurant

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1952-60

Current location (optional) Nirvana

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

The Eastwood Tavern (aka t'tavern) could have been the inspiration for the Rovers Return - xsept the folk didn't talk Manc and they didn't have pretentious expectations of themselves.It was a real centre of local discussion and rumour. Sad to see it so decline. Who's to blame? Asda, t'Koran or social mobility?

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1952-60

Current location (optional) Nirvana

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

Probably because nobody who lives win a 100 yard radius of the place drinks alcohol.

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

Re Eastwood Tavern. I dont know how true it is but I was told that in the 'Smoke' there used to be a table with a ring in the middle ( I have seen the table). They used to tie a rat to the ring and two men with their hands firmly behind their backs would try to kill the rat with their teeth. There was much betting on the outcome.
There is in Keighley Library the original of the town constable's logbook and many of the older pubs are mentioned in there as he fought a running battle with some landlords for after hours drinking.
In the log book he mentions finding a drunk outside Eastwood Tavern, 'asleep under his horse his hair frozen to the ground' and one 'not sound in the head' stood naked in Keighley Beck singing hymns. The constable reports putting him on his road home to Halifax.

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

Reading all the related posts to this thread reminds of the joke about an Irishman on his first visit to Keighley. You will forgive me if i get a few wrongOK.
His brother assurred ourtraveller he would like Keighley but warned him only ever to drink in a taylors pub. The man arrived just about twenty minutes before closing time and dashed out of the railway station into the Victoria Hotel. Is this a Taylor's house he asked. No, we sell only Ramsden's Trough Ales came the reply Across the road to the Cavendish. Sorry only Tetley's, onto North Street into the Star. Sorry we are BYB here. Onto the Cross and into the Rodney. Yes we are Taylor's he was told.
'Thank God for that. Give us a glass of Guiness.' He gasped.
Joking aside we were singularly lucky to have the best beer in the world from Taylors and the best meat pies from Midgleys ( or Pearson's). That is not just local prejudice and pride speaking it is established fact.EKY

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

Clearly, Arthur, the fact that the guy was 'singing hymns' tells us the constable's judgement was sound! Your story about the rat (which I vaguely remember being told about in my childhood) reminds me - on the theme of 'long lost pubs' - that there was once a pub in Keighley called 'The Grinning Rat'. Where was it? And how long since it disappeared? Did anyone know it as one of their 'haunts'?

Doug

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1951-58

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

That would be the "Queen Street Arms", a Hey's Ales pub. Demolished in the mid sixties to make way for the new shopping centre. Sad day.

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

Sorry to spoil your joke Arthur but during the reign of (Sir) John Aked Taylor only Taylor's own brews were permitted. Their closest equivalent to 'the black stuff' being 'Black Bess' stout (bottled). That said, many of their landlords did keep 'bootleg' Jubillee and Mackeson under the counter but never the other stuff!

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1959 - 66

Current location (optional) Embsay but my days here are numbered

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

Doug; In answer to your your question regarding a public house by the name of 'The Grinning Rat', I do remember a pub named 'The Devonshire Arms' which stood on the corner of Church St and High St, by the lights. This pub changed its name to 'The Grinning Rat' back in the 90's or early 'naughties', much to the chagrin of a certain Ian Dewhirst MBE. In more recent times it has changed its name yet again, to 'The Korner Bar' and at the moment, there is a very large sign at first floor level, with 'K2' on the gable end. The 'Rat', it seems' was short-lived!! David

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1945-50

Current location (optional) Keighley

Re: Re: Long lost publichouses

Following my previous posting, I thought I might mention that my old pub, The Turkey Inn, at Goose Eye, has thankfully re-opened following a period of decline, closure, protracted price negotiations and refurbishment, and is once again up and running. New carpets, new kitchen, new landlord and a warm, welcoming atmosphere giving this small village pub a deserving new lease of life when so many are closing down.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1945-50

Current location (optional) Keighley

Long lost publichouses

DAVID,
may I respectfully suggest that the word you sought was "NOUGHTIES" not naughties, but, perhaps you are correct in the first instance !!


Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1950=55

Current location (optional) KEIGHLEY

Re: Long lost publichouses

I stumbled upon the following website this afternoon:

http://www.valendale.myby.co.uk/pubs.html

which might bring-back many happy memories for Old Keighlians.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1959 - 1966

Current location (optional) Shoreham-by-Sea