www.kbgs.com

KBGS Old Boys' Forum

A place to discuss Keighley Boys' Grammar School. 


Terms of use.  Anonymous, offensive, or malicious postings will  be deleted. School-related topics only please. If you need to add a "family notice" reply to any of the current messages in that thread, and remember to change the Subject to the name of the newsworthy person.

 

 

KBGS Old Boys' Forum
Start a New Topic 
Author
Comment
CLASSIC(?) LINES

From Victoria Wood (Dinner Lady)

" Everywhere in Scotland is spelt.......................

ECCLEFECHAN

and pronounced KIRKCOOBRIE"


In my day, there were similar problems eg

LORCUM
CALLYDONIAH
BRATFUD

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1952/1960

Current location (optional) Nirvana

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES


.. and
OWUTH
SLAWIT
BARLICK

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1958-65

Current location (optional) Leeds

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

Aye, and theres APPLETHWICK , and LINFIT (Near SLAWIT) an' all. An' nivver forget OXNUP

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 58-64

Current location (optional) Wirral

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

Sorry. Forgot 2 of my alma maters
E - stwud and Pa Kwud

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1952/1960

Current location (optional) Nirvana

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

... and INGERER

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1958-65

Current location (optional) Leeds

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

What about:

QUARP?

aka Co-Op?

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1959-66

Current location (optional) Shoreham-by-Sea

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

Yes David.
Years ago I started a thread called "What happened to the "Divi"". It was mangled by some unknown person who invaded the website, but part of it remains as "Re: What happened to the "Divi"". In it you'll see that my spelling of co-op was kworp.
Maybe that indicates a slightly different pronunciation of the word in our two families.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1958-65

Current location (optional) Leeds

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

As in "Arm goin' rarned tut kwop.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 55 - 60

Current location (optional) Harrogate

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

Stop that or Ah'll gie thee a reight good hidin'

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 58-64

Current location (optional) Wirral

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

Crikey, Brian, did they pronounce the aitch in your 'ouse?

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

Oops ! No we didnt Alec.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 58-64

Current location (optional) Wirral

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

In the opposite direction...the sound "th" as in thwaite or firth was well pronounced in the past (I believe), but it seems to be more and more pronounced as "f".

I hear "One Two Free" for 1 2 3 these days, even in Yorkshire. I blame the cockneys!

My dad always used to say Kworp. I thought that was standard pronunciation till my teens
Chris

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

Must say, Chris, I've never heard that kind of fing in Yorkshire (other than from people with slight speech problems). Mostly it's things like "bo''le" and "ke''le".

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1958-65

Current location (optional) Leeds

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

In the younger generation it is definitely gaining ground.

Th' sound to vanish from English language by 2066 because of multiculturalism, say linguists
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2016/09/28/th-sound-to-vanish-from-english-language-by-2066-because-of-mult/

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

Be suspicious of that prediction, Chris, sounds like 'Brexit' propaganda to me!

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1951-58

Current location (optional) Keswick, Cumbria

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

apparently it comes from researchers at University of York, not exactly a Brexit hotspot!

in any case, it's something I've noticed since coming back here. Another one is "Q. How are you? A. Good" which annoys me too.

Getting a bit off topic here though...

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

When asked 'How are you'. Grandfather would reply 'Ahm none the better for seeing ya' or 'Ahm one day nearer death'

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 58-64

Current location (optional) Wirral

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

I ollas understood the were only three (tree?) Answers to "'Ow is tha?" 1) Middlin'. 2) Just middlin'. 3) Nobbut middlin'.

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

Where I lived, the three answers were," Middlin,". "Fair ter middlin", and "Fair ter middlin nowt much".

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1945 - 50

Current location (optional) Norfolk

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

"Middlin", "Fair ter middlin" and "Livin".

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1958-65

Current location (optional) Leeds

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

The language is moving on however much our preference for the tongue of our childhood slips away.
Even BBC announcers use terms such as brovver; bovver. - and the many more egs you can think of - (or listen for).
Is this the end of the inevitable decline of "thorn" - the voiced "th" as in "that" shown in our earlier scripts as Thorn or þorn,.
Þ, þ is a letter in Old English - a voiced "th" which in our (their?) speech is rapidly giving way to "v" and "vv".
Listen out for it - but please - don't use it - not in Keeþley!!

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1952-60

Current location (optional) Nirvana

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

Voiced th met its demise centuries ago in Yorkshire, which is why, in Keefley, we allus went to t'flicks on Saturday mornings.

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

Allan, I've always found the Yorkshire " t' " interesting.
When it's written it always comes out as "t'flicks", "t'shop" etc.
However, if you hear it spoken, the t' is normally added to the previous word, not the subsequent one ,as in "Ah saw 'im gerrin' on ter't bus."
Southerners who try to imitate Yorkshire speech would usually end up saying "I saw him getting on to terbus."
I wonder why poeple trying to write Yorkshire-speak can't see the error.

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1958-65

Current location (optional) Leeds

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

Surely it's a "glottal stop" It's silent. As in -if you listen carefully, you won't hear it.❔

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

It is indeed pronounced as a glottal stop and maybe what would be best, in terms of writing it, would be a t with some form of of accent ( I’ve often envisaged a t with a circle on top, like Danish å )...As for placement, Shaun, I think “goin' to t’flicks” is preferable to “goin’ to’t flicks*, as t’ is the definite article of the next word, and the ‘ denotes an abbreviation of the missing “he” in “the”. How did the Brontës write it? Can’t now remember....

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

The pronunciation is somewhere between tut and tet. How you would write it to accurately explain to someone who has never heard it is anyone's guess.

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

Just stumbled across this interesting thread. Emily Bronte has Joseph talking about 'pailin t'guilp off t'porridge' in "Wuthering Heights" but I suspect she was merely following (or being made to follow) an already established typographical convention. Perhaps the best way of reproducing the sound orthographically would be to isolate the t' when it precedes a consonant, because there is always a hiatus, however slight, between t' and the following consonant e.g. pailin t' guilp AND off t' porridge, though read aloud it would sound more like 'pailint' guilp' and 'offt' porridge', and maybe that's a better way of reproducing it? But when it comes to the t' before a vowel neither of the above quite works and would need to be amended e.g. he were up ont'horse OR even upont'horse; OR e.g. am thinkint'only thing is...

What do you think?

Doug

Years at KBGS e.g. 1958-1964 (optional) 1951-58

Current location (optional) Keswick, Cumbria

Re: CLASSIC(?) LINES

You might be onto something there, Doug. The apostrophe in your stand alone t' acts as an accent to denote the glo t' t' al stop! Scots Gaelic does something similar: Tha mi a' bruidhinn means I talk, or literally Am I at talking. A' is an abbreviation of aig = at. Not many KBGS folk know that. And why should they?